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Article
January 1923

CHRONIC NONINFLAMMATORY LESIONS OF THE KNEE JOINT

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section on Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic.

Arch Surg. 1923;6(1_PART_I):118-135. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1923.01110160128007
Abstract

The knee joint is the largest joint in the body, and one looks at its structure in the skeleton, only to marvel at its stability during life. The two broad surfaces of the femur and tibia are fitted together only lightly, the round condyles of the femur resting in the slightly concave surfaces of the tuberosities of the tibia. The semilunar cartilages deepen somewhat the shallow fossae for the reception of the condyles, and to a certain extent increase stability, although they do not act as ligaments. They are fibrocartilaginous and, therefore, are more prone to rip or to tear than they are to fracture. The patella is a sesamoid bone, and is of importance in maintaining stability of the joint only so far as its association with the quadriceps muscle is concerned. It is, therefore, evident that the strength of the knee joint must be furnished by a satisfactory

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