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Article
May 1923

TWENTIETH REPORT OF PROGRESS IN ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY

Arch Surg. 1923;6(3):858-908. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1923.01110190201012
Abstract

CONGENITAL CONDITIONS  Congenital Dislocation of the Shoulder.—Todd,1 in examining the shoulder joint of 730 subjects in the dissecting room of Western Reserve Medical School, found three cases of what he terms posterior congenital dislocation of the shoulder of the subacromial type. The chief deformity is in the scapula, the glenoid being rotated backward on the blade. There is a drooping of the acromion, and while the humeral head remains in articulation with the glenoid, its configuration may be changed. In this series, there were no congenital dislocations of the radius or of the femur.Congenital Defects of the Spine and Ribs.—Sever,2 in a study of more than 2,000 roentgenograms of the spine, taken at the Boston Children's Hospital for various reasons, found twenty-two cases of cervical ribs, in nine of which there were other deformities of the vertebrae or ribs. In twenty-six cases, there were defects

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