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Article
July 1923

BLOOD TRANSFUSION: A STUDY OF TWO HUNDRED AND FORTY-FIVE CASES

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine and the Surgical Service of the Barnes and St. Louis Children's Hospitals.

Arch Surg. 1923;7(1):125-153. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1923.01120010128008
Abstract

The rational basis of blood transfusion was established by the discovery of the phenomenon that the serum of one individual frequently agglutinates the corpuscles of another individual's blood. This discovery of so-called isohemagglutination was made simultaneously in 1899-1900 by the Englishman Shattock,1 and the Austrian Landsteiner.2 Following this, Jansky,3 in 1906, was able to classify human blood into four groups according to their agglutinating reactions. In 1910, Moss4 independently made a similar classification of serum agglutinins. The two classifications differ, however, in that Moss's Group IV corresponds to Jansky's Group I and Jansky's Group IV corresponds to Moss's Group I. In order that there might be a universal classification of blood groups, eliminating confusion and accident incident to the use of different classifications, a committee appointed by the American Association of Immunologists, the Society of American Bacteriologists and the Association of Pathologists and Bacteriologists has recommended

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