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Article
July 1923

THE CHEMICAL PATHOLOGY OF PYLORIC OCCLUSION IN RELATION TO TETANYA STUDY OF THE CHLORID, CARBON DIOXID AND UREA CONCENTRATIONS IN THE BLOOD

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Presbyterian Hospital and the laboratories of the Department of Surgery, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University.

Arch Surg. 1923;7(1):166-196. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1923.01120010169010
Abstract

Gastric tetany, that form of nerve hyperirritability associated with vomiting, dilatation of the stomach and pyloric occlusion, has interested and puzzled physicians for years. The condition is included in the realm of surgery, since it is usually the result of a gross lesion near the pylorus, and, consequently, its cure depends on operative measures. The clinical literature on the subject has established no definite etiology and the various theories proposed to explain the relationship between the disturbance of gastric physiology and tetany have been unconvincing.

In this paper are recorded the clinical histories and blood analyses of seven cases of obstruction at or near the pylorus, with a summary of the results of some experimental work on dogs. The facts to be presented support the theory that directs attention to the loss of hydrochloric acid from the stomach as the cause of critical changes in the composition and physiochemical properties

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