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Article
July 1923

A STUDY OF THE VIABILITY OF BONE AFTER REMOVAL FROM THE BODY

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Surgical Pathological Laboratory of Stanford University School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1923;7(1):213-226. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1923.01120010216012
Abstract

As a primary working principle, it is necessary to have a definite conception of the difference between death of the organism and death of its component parts. The life of the higher animals is dependent on an intact respiratory, circulatory and central nervous system, and, in consequence of the permanent destruction of one of these systems, there necessarily results the death of the individual. The various organs and tissues of the body are more or less dependent on the successful functioning of these systems for an adequate supply of nourishment, and, as soon as there is a disturbance in their working, with a diminution of the essential elements, there is a beginning degeneration of the organ or atrophy of the tissue. They are, however, able to withstand, for a limited period, the complete severance of their nutritive sources so that the ultimate death or degeneration of the organs and tissues

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