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July 1923


Author Affiliations

Fellow in Surgery, Mayo Foundation ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section on Surgical Pathology.

Arch Surg. 1923;7(1):227-236. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1923.01120010230013

Mueller,1 in 1838, first suggested the term "desmoid tumor," but it was not accepted generally until Sänger2 published four papers (1880 to 1885) describing tumors arising from the round and the broad ligaments, the periosteum of the pelvic bones and from the abdominal walls. Ledderhose,3 in 1890, collected from the literature 100 cases of such tumors in the abdominal walls. Pfeiffer,4 in 1904, published a comprehensive review of the subject and reported forty cases from his own clinic and 260 from the literature. These with Ledderhose's 100 cases made a total of 400. Pfeiffer limited the use of the term "desmoid" to fibromas arising in the musculo-aponeurotic structures of the abdominal walls, and this interpretation has been generally accepted.

Powers,5 in 1905, reported three cases of his own and abstracted the work of Pfeiffer in detail. Stone,6 in 1908, reported a case of his

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