September 1923


Author Affiliations

From the Montreal General Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1923;7(2):321-331. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1923.01120020087006

An exercise in anatomy which may be undertaken with profit is provided by a consideration of the influence exerted by the more resistant tissues of the body in controlling the spread of pus.

A recognition of the importance of this influence is no doubt responsible for the time-honored emphasis placed on certain structures, such as the deep cervical and the pelvic fascia, which have long been a source of mystification in the dissecting room. The importance of these structures almost warrants the care that is devoted to their demonstration, for a knowledge of the possible directions in which pus is likely to travel and to "point," in the neck, in the pelvis and elsewhere throughout the body is of more than speculative interest.

The recent occurrence of some unusual cases of purulent pleurisy prompted a consideration of the possible consequences when a purulent effusion in the pleural cavity is for

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