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March 1924

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE PERIOSTEUM AND THE ENDOSTEUM IN THE REPAIR OF TRANSPLANTED BONE

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Surgical Laboratory of Stanford University School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1924;8(2):535-556. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1924.01120050076004
Abstract

Almost two hundred years have elapsed since the beginning of the debate over the importance of the periosteum in bone growth, regeneration and repair; and in spite of the vast amount of experimental and clinical evidence submitted by the adherents of the two views, namely, the one that the periosteum is an osteogenic membrane, and the other that it is merely an inert limiting membrane, there exists today the same two factions, as in the early part of the eighteenth century.

In a most interesting review of this subject, Keith1 presents many important facts connected with the early study of bone growth. He shows how Belchier,2 in 1736, after investigating the chance observation of a calico printer who had found that the bones of his madderfed pigs were stained red, discovered that only new bone took the red stain.

Duhamel,3 in 1739, utilizing the important discovery of

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