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November 1924

THE SURGICAL TREATMENT OF MITRAL STENOSIS: EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL STUDIES

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Laboratory of Surgical Research, Harvard Medical School, and the medical and surgical clinics of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1924;9(3):689-821. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1924.01120090206014
Abstract

I. INTRODUCTION  Surgery of the heart, even in its original and simplest form, that dealing with the treatment of traumatic wounds, is still in its infancy. Long before the function of the heart was known (1628),1 the frightful mortality following wounds of this organ left the ancients2 with the deeply rooted conviction that any injury to it would necessarily prove fatal. This impression existed up to quite modern times. When Paré3 described the case of a man who received a wound of the heart in a duel and ran after his adversary 230 yards before succumbing to the injury, the learned societies of his times were greatly perturbed by this almost unbelievable observation. Still more recently (1883), Billroth remarked that no surgeon who wished to preserve the respect of his colleagues would ever attempt the suture of a wound of the heart, and in 1884 Riedinger4

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