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Article
July 1925

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE PATHOLOGIC AND CLINICAL ASPECTS OF THE DISEASES OF THE THYROID GLAND

Author Affiliations

Assistant Attending Surgeon, French Hospital; Assistant Attending Gynecologist, Harlem Hospital NEW YORK

Arch Surg. 1925;11(1):74-92. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1925.01120130081005
Abstract

Any attempt to correlate the clinical and pathologic aspects of the thyroid gland encounters many difficulties. At present it is almost impossible to visualize just what may be considered the normal thyroid at various ages and under various conditions of environment, because the gland is quickly and markedly affected by external stimuli. McCarrison1 has shown that certain variations in food, especially if the food supply is improper or defective, cause a marked change in the histology of the gland. It has also been shown that the structure of the gland varies during different physiologic states, such as puberty, menstruation and pregnancy. Isenschmid2 and Damberg3 have shown that the histologic appearance of the thyroid varies according to the geographical habitat of the individual. A gland that would be considered normal in a native of the mountainous regions of Bern would not be regarded as normal if found in

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