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Article
July 1925

A REVIEW OF UROLOGIC SURGERY

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES; ROCHESTER, MINN.; ROANOKE, VA.; TORONTO; ANTWERP, BELGIUM

Arch Surg. 1925;11(1):152-170. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1925.01120130161010
Abstract

TRANSPLANTED MUSCLE IN RESECTION OF THE KIDNEY  Ciminata1 covered the raw surface of the renal parenchyma of dogs with a strip of muscle to prevent bleeding after resection of a portion of the kidney. Portions of the surface of the kidney were removed or one of the renal poles resected; muscle tissue was sutured over the raw surface. This underwent gradual degeneration and was replaced by connective tissue. The cut surface of the kidney healed quickly and without bleeding. In none of the experiments was regeneration of the transplanted muscle noted.[ED. Note.—It has long been known that the use of transplanted muscle tissue as a hemostatic is one of the most satisfactory methods of controlling bleeding from surfaces, especially in operations on the brain. Muscle tissue regenerates poorly at best, and as a transplant it usually atrophies and is gradually replaced by fibroblastic tissue. The use of

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