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Article
August 1925

VARIATIONS IN BLOOD SUGAR IN RELATION TO OPERATION ON THE THYROID GLAND

Author Affiliations

Instructor in Surgery, Medical School of Harvard University; Formerly Resident Surgeon, Massachusetts General Hospital; Assistant Professor of Surgery, Medical School of Harvard University; Surgeon, Massachusetts General Hospital BOSTON
From the Third Surgical Service of the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1925;11(2):171-179. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1925.01120140002001
Abstract

INTRODUCTION 

Blood Sugar.  —Variations in the amount of sugar in the blood occur from many different physiologic and pathologic causes. In recent years, determination of the blood sugar in clinical cases has become of great importance, especially in diabetes. It has also been used experimentally in many fields of research. No attempt will be made to review again the literature of this subject, as this was done by McLeod,1 in 1921. Since then, all the insulin2 work has increased many fold the already enormous literature.The important thing for us to remember is that, although the normal fasting and resting blood sugar is quite constant, many different factors can raise or lower it. The chief physiologic factors involved in its control and the difficulties in studying them have been well summarized by McLeod.1Addition of glucose to the blood may be the result of: (a) absorption from

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