[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.163.158.163. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 1926

CAN PLEURAL EFFUSIONS FOLLOWING THORACOTOMIES BE PREVENTED BY ARTIFICIAL PNEUMOTHORAX?

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

Arch Surg. 1926;12(4):919-927. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1926.01130040132007
Abstract

Some remarkable results were reported by an Italian surgeon, Morelli,1 in the treatment of war wounds of the lung and pleura by means of artificial pneumothorax. He asserts that he had a mortality of only 5 per cent, in penetrating gunshot injuries of the thorax, as compared with the 30 per cent, mortality of the English and American armies. It was with a view of determining whether his procedure could be applied with advantage after operations within the thorax that this study was undertaken.

HISTORY  Artificial pneumothorax is by no means a new procedure. As early as 1822, James Carson of Liverpool suggested its use and experimented with its effect on the circulation. In 1882 Forlanini introduced it in the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. He later proposed its use for lung abscess, bronchiectasis, and finally for tuberculous pleural effusions. Experimental studies on dogs of the effect of pneumothorax on

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×