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Article
July 1926

GROWTH DISTURBANCES FOLLOWING RESECTION OF JOINTS

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the surgical laboratory of Stanford University School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1926;13(1):56-63. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1926.01130070059003
Abstract

The advisability for the resection of a joint in a growing individual with intact, epiphyseal cartilage plates is the subject for as much discussion today as it has been during the last century and a half.

It is of considerable interest to recall briefly the early history of joint resection, bearing in mind the added difficulties in the days before antisepsis and anesthesia. The first resection of the hip joint is accredited to Anthony White in 1721, the first resection of the elbow joint to Wainman in 1758, and the first resection of the knee joint to Filkin about the same time. However, the credit for the first successful resection of the knee joint is generally given to Park of Manchester. His patient, a man aged 33, obtained such a good result that he was able later to go to sea.

Of more direct interest because of its bearing on

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