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Article
May 1927

THIRTY-SECOND REPORT OF PROGRESS IN ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY

Author Affiliations

BOSTON; HALLE, GERMANY; LOUVAIN, BELGIUM

Arch Surg. 1927;14(5):1107-1124. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1927.01130170155007
Abstract

CONGENITAL DEFORMITIES 

Congenital Dislocation of Hip.  —From a study of 349 cases of congenital dislocation of the hip, Engelmann1 is led to the conclusion that heredity plays a large part in the etiology. He describes the architectural similarity which he found in the pelvic bones of different members of one family, and he believes that the bony features which conduce to mechanically weak joints may likewise be transmitted to descendants. In 253 cases he was able to demonstrate, in addition to the dislocation of the hip, other congenital lesions, most frequently clubfoot.Ryerson2 believes that much of the difficulty in maintaining reduction of the hip in infants after manipulation may be avoided by the use of removable celluloid casts. These are not affected by the contamination of urine and feces, may be washed, and possess other obvious advantages over plaster.Adams3 describes the obstacles to reduction which

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