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Article
November 1927

CHANGES IN THE CHEMISTRY OF THE CONTENTS OF THE STOMACH FOLLOWING GASTRIC OPERATIONS

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.
From the Physiology Department of the University of Oregon Medical School.

Arch Surg. 1927;15(5):749-761. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1927.01130230085007
Abstract

Surgeons advocating radical operation (Lewisohn1 and de Takata2) and even those advocating conservative methods (Portis and Portis3) in the treatment of gastric and duodenal ulcers agree that gastrectomy produces a lower acidity or an anacidity in the contents of the stomach. The mechanism concerned in bringing about this change, however, is a subject of controversy. Deaver and Reimann4 stated that the resection of the antrum does away with the area of the stomach mucosa that secretes acid. This is contrary to anatomic and physiologic facts. The antrum is lined by pyloric glands which contain no, or only a few, acid cells (Steinberg5). These glands secrete only an alkaline form of mucus (Babkin6). The relation of the mucosa of the antrum to the secretion of gastric juice was first called to our attention by Edkins.7 This investigator found that extracts of the mucosa of

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