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Article
January 1928

THIRTY-FOURTH REPORT OF PROGRESS IN ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY

Author Affiliations

BOSTON; HALLE, GERMANY; LOUVAIN, BELGIUM

Arch Surg. 1928;16(1):153-168. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1928.01140010157010
Abstract

CONGENITAL DEFORMITIES 

Congenital Dislocation of the Hip.  —Willard1 reviewed the results of reduction by the Davis method in twenty cases of congenital dislocation of the hip five years after operation. Six of the patients showed bilateral dislocations. Reports were made on twenty-six hips. The results were: Ten per cent failure, both bilateral dislocations; 30 per cent, reduced but unstable; 60 per cent of good functional results in all single dislocations. In studying the 30 per cent of the cases in which the dislocations were reduced but unstable, Willard felt that much of the change that takes place in the head and acetabulum after reduction is due to injury at the time of reduction. From this he advocated reduction (closed) before weight-bearing begins, if possible. Reduction should be accomplished by the gentlest sort of manipulations. The type of manipulation is of less importance than the amount of skill with which

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