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Article
January 1928

ETIOLOGY OF ABSCESS OF THE LUNGEXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL STUDIES

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine and Barnes Hospital, St. Louis.

Arch Surg. 1928;16(1):179-191. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1928.01140010183013
Abstract

The causative factors of nontuberculous abscesses of the lung are not fully known. How does the infection reach the lungs? Are there specific bacteria? Why does one person develop an abscess of the lung after a certain operative procedure while another person does not acquire such an abscess after an apparently identical procedure? This is a report of the experimental production of abscesses of the lung by aspiration, and the translation of these experimental observations into some of their clinical correlatives.

ROUTES OF ENTRY  There are three possible routes of entry for the infection in abscess of the lung. The first is direct, by way of the respiratory passages; the second is indirect, by way of the blood stream, and the third is by way of the lymphatics. The direct aspiratory route and the indirect route through the blood stream have seemed the most probable routes of entry.A considerable

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