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Article
August 1928

EFFECTS OF INJECTIONS OF ACID AND TRAUMA ON JEJUNAL TRANSPLANTS TO THE STOMACH

Author Affiliations

Seymour Coman Fellow in the Department of Physiology of the University of Chicago and the Department of Surgery of Rush Medical College of the University of Chicago CHICAGO

Arch Surg. 1928;17(2):279-288. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1928.01140080109005
Abstract

Experimental data are presented on further studies on intestinal segments transplanted to the stomach. Particular study has been made of the influences of the chemical and traumatic factors in the etiology of ulcer.

The almost constant observation of hydrochloric acid in clinical peptic ulcer has frequently led to the conclusion that it is an essential element in its production. Experimentally, however, it has been rather definitely established by many workers that uninjured intestinal mucosa is unaffected by exposure to the digestive action of gastric juice.

Isolated segments of intestine, with their blood supply intact, transplanted to the stomachs of dogs, remained unchanged in the experiments of Hotz1 and Licini.2 Later, Dragstedt and Vaughn3 showed that various parts of the intestinal tract, kidney and spleen transplanted to the stomach remained normal when subjected to the digestive action of gastric juice for long periods. In an experimental study of

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