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Article
January 1, 1929

NEW METHODS OF ANASTOMOSIS OF THE COMMON BILE DUCTAN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery, Rush Medical College of the University of Chicago CHICAGO

Arch Surg. 1929;18(1_PART_I):117-128. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1929.04420010119005
Abstract

There is, at present, a general uncertainty about the satisfactory outcome of repair of the common bile duct. One may classify restoration of the bile passages into: (1) end to end suture of the ducts, (2) implantation of the bile ducts into the duodenum or stomach, (3) bridging a gap by a rubber tube or by foreign tissue grafts and (4) repair by pedunculated flaps from the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, gallbladder or skin.

End to end suture of a dilated part of the common duct over a buried rubber tube was performed by Doyen,1 in 1892, following the removal of a large stone. Death resulted from hepatic insufficiency. Kehr2 found it advisable to bring a rubber T tube out through the union for drainage. Jacobson3 stated that complete closure of the duct at the suture line was undesirable, and he observed secondary stenosis in a number of cases at reoperation.

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