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April 1929

EXPERIMENTAL THROMBOPHLEBITIS AND LYMPHATIC OBSTRUCTION OF THE LOWER LIMBA PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

From the Laboratory of Surgical Research, Harvard Medical School.

Arch Surg. 1929;18(4):992-997. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1929.01140130080003
Abstract

In the preparation of a paper on thrombophlebitis and its sequelae, read before the American Surgical Association in 1927, one of us attempted to reproduce the disease by injecting a coagulant into an isolated segment of the femoral vein. One attempt out of three was remarkably successful, and the animal developed a typical phlegmasia alba dolens. The swelling appeared two days after the operation, remained at its height for a day or two, and at the end of eight days had disappeared. The whole course of the condition resembled the mildest sort of iliac or femoral phlebitis in the human being. At the postmortem examination it was found that the surrounding soft parts were firmly adherent to the femoral vein in the area between the ligatures which had been placed just above the knee and just proximal to the inguinal ligament, respectively, about 2 inches (5.08 cm.) apart. Only a

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