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Article
April 1929

HORNER AND THE SYNDROME OF PARALYSIS OF THE CERVICAL SYMPATHETIC

Arch Surg. 1929;18(4):2025-2039. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1929.01140131129078
Abstract

In recent years, experimental and clinical neurology have become mutually dependent, and it is refreshing to record an early phase of their association. The theme, too, is a fitting one, since he whom we wish to honor has devoted himself equally to the laboratory and the clinic—to the great benefit of both. The shrewd clinical observations of Horner are, moreover, strongly reminiscent of the "Chief," being painstaking, accurate and far-seeing.

The symptom-complex known variously as the Claude Bernard-Horner syndrome (in France), Budge's phenomenon (among physiologists), but usually and more rightly as Horner's syndrome, is characterized by sinking-in of the eyeball (enophthalmos), narrowing of the palpebral fissure, drooping of the upper lid and slight elevation of the lower, constriction of the pupil, and by certain anomalies in vasomotor and sudorific activity of the neck and face. It is seen in traumatic injuries of the cervical spine, in tumors of the spinal

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