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Article
August 1929

THE RELATION OF THE ADRENAL GLAND TO THE TOXEMIA OF INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTIONAN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS
From the Department of Surgery, Tulane Medical School, Tulane University.

Arch Surg. 1929;19(2):272-291. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1929.01150020105002
Abstract

A rather considerable volume of experimental and controversial literature on the general subject of intestinal obstruction has appeared within recent years and has served to focus the interest of the surgeon on this interesting, and often most trying, condition. Much of interest has apparently been demonstrated as to both pathology and treatment, considerably more has been surmised and hypothecated, and still more is as yet unknown. From a practical point of view the alkalosis and dehydration which occur, particularly in so-called "high intestinal obstruction," and the diminished chloride content of the blood plasma, have served as valuable points of departure for therapeutic measures, but rather obviously the correction of such abnormalities partakes of the nature of symptomatic rather than curative treatment. The treatment for certain types of obstruction by the administration of spinal anesthesia has been successfully used by many clinicians, especially in the European clinics, and is rational in

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