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Article
November 1929

CORRELATIONS OF INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL PANCREATIC SECRETIONIII. THE EFFECT OF LIGATION OF THE TAIL OF THE PANCREAS ON DIASTASE IN THE BLOOD

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Departments of Surgery and Physiology, Northwestern University Medical School.; Elizabeth Ward Fellow in Surgery.

Arch Surg. 1929;19(5):788-793. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1929.01150050019003
Abstract

In previous communications,1 I have described the histologic effects produced by separating the tail of the pancreas from the rest of the body. It has been known since the work of Wohlgemuth,2 confirmed by Noguchi3 and by Gould and Carlson,4 that the diastase in the blood rises for a short time following ligation of the duct. Our histologic studies have shown the presence of marked edema of the separated tail for the first two weeks, later followed by a gradual atrophy of the glands of external secretion. In this series of experiments we have attempted to correlate our morphologic observations with values for diastase in the blood.

The purpose of this study was to establish with a simple test whether ligation of the tail would cause an increased absorption of pancreatic diastase. It was undertaken to establish the duration of the pancreatitis following ligation of the

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