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Article
December 1930

ANTEROLATERAL COSTECTOMY FOR INADEQUATE COLLAPSE FOLLOWING POSTERIOR EXTRAPLEURAL THORACOPLASTY

Arch Surg. 1930;21(6):1114-1124. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1930.01150180230013

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Abstract

Rest, collapse and compression of the diseased lung are accepted fundamental principles in the treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis. That degree of suspended activity or compression is indicated that is necessary to bring about permanent arrest of the tuberculous lesion, to relax the tension of the scar tissue and to heal cavities. The decreased demands on respiratory function incident to physical inactivity or rest in bed may fulfil the indications. The degree of rest and partial collapse of the lung that results from paralyzing the diaphragm by phrenic crushing or evulsion may turn the tide. The effectiveness of collapse following artificial pneumothorax is due to the relatively complete collapse of the diseased lung. The failures of this method are due chiefly to adhesions preventing complete collapse, to too early abandonment of the method and to complications attributable to it.

The principles underlying posterior extrapleural thoracoplasty are practically identical with those of

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