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Article
March 1931

THE ASSOCIATION OF RAYNAUD'S DISEASE WITH CEREBRAL SYMPTOMSREPORT OF A CASE WITH MIGRAINE, PSYCHONEUROTIC SYMPTOMS, TRANSIENT HEMIPLEGIA AND DEATH

Arch Surg. 1931;22(3):409-414. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1931.01160030060003
Abstract

In 1862, Raynaud1 described the disease which bears his name. It is characterized by attacks of vasomotor and trophic disturbances in which local syncope (blanching) may be followed by local asphyxia (cyanosis) in peripheral portions of the body which may or may not be symmetrical. Paresthesias usually accompany these symptoms and signs. Despite the lack of vascular occlusion, peripheral gangrene is common. The disease is more frequent in neuropathic young women than in men. In a carefully studied history, psychic trauma or prolonged exposure to cold often suggests a not improbable etiologic influence. The symptom-complex, with varying characteristics, may continue intermittently over a number of years. According to Raynaud1 and Buerger,2 mild sensory disturbances are usually present, and hemoglobinuria, arthropathies and cerebral symptoms are sometimes observed. Differential diagnosis, not infrequently difficult, is also classified by Buerger.2 In this paper the cerebral phenomena of Raynaud's disease will

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