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Article
May 1931

SARCOMA OF THE ESOPHAGUS

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS
From the Department of Surgery and the Cancer Institute, University of Minnesota.

Arch Surg. 1931;22(5):794-809. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1931.01160050105006
Abstract

Carcinoma of the esophagus constitutes 50 per cent of all lesions of the esophagus (Abel1). Sarcoma, on the other hand, is a rare condition (Ewing,2 Kaufmann, Aschoff, Fischer3). Recently, there came under my observation a patient with such a lesion, and I therefore feel justified in reporting the case.

REPORT OF CASE 

History.  —Mrs. R. T., a white woman, aged 27, was admitted to the University Hospital on June 11, 1927, complaining of epigastric pain, diarrhea and constipation. Since March 8, 1927, she had suffered considerably with a burning epigastric pain which radiated to both sides of the thorax and up into the axillae, especially to the left. The pain had been present almost daily, and it usually lasted from one-half to six hours. She belched considerable gas and passed much flatus, but without relief. There was no qualitative or quantitative food distress. The pain often bothered

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