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June 1931

PNEUMATIC RUPTURE OF THE INTESTINAL CANALWITH EXPERIMENTAL DATA SHOWING THE MECHANISM OF PERFORATION AND THE PRESSURE REQUIRED

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN
From the First Surgical Service, Methodist Episcopal Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1931;22(6):875-902. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1931.01160060003001
Abstract

Pneumatic rupture of the intestinal canal is one of the most uncommon conditions, and is due to the introduction of air under pressure into the oral cavity or the rectum.

Forty cases of pneumatic rupture of the alimentary canal, including one case of rupture of the esophagus, have been reported previously. The one reported and the three referred to in this paper increase the total to forty-four cases.

Twenty-six years ago (1904), G. W. Stone1 of London reported the first case of pneumatic rupture of the intestine. The other cases recorded are: Andrews,2 one, with a review of fifteen others; Bendixen and Blything,3 one, with a collection of seven others; Fauquez4 and Jean5 of France, two each, and one each by Block and Weissman,6 Buchbinder,7 Cotton,8 Duval9 of France, Hailes10 of Australia, Hays,11 Houzel12 of France, Morris,13

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