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Article
January 1932

FORTY-SIXTH REPORT OF PROGRESS IN ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY

Author Affiliations

BOSTON; ROCHESTER, MINN.; PROVIDENCE, R. I.; LONDON, ENGLAND; LOUVAIN, BELGIUM; HALLE, GERMANY

Arch Surg. 1932;24(1):158-170. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1932.01160130161012
Abstract

CONGENITAL DEFORMITIES 

Cervical Rib.  —Telford and Stopford1 recorded three cases of cervical rib in which the prominent symptoms were due to thrombotic obliteration of the arteries of the arm. These cases resembled one another in their gradual onset, the initial pallor, coldness and numbness of the limb, the occurrence of gangrene and the cessation of all pulse at a point about the junction of the axillary and brachial arteries, and finally in their complete recovery following the removal of a cervical rib. In no case was the subclavian artery found at operation to be constricted. Telford and Stopford believed the thrombosis to be due to irritation of the sympathetic nerve fibers supplying the peripheral arteries. They demonstrated by histologic sections that these sympathetic nerve fibers lie in the lowest trunk of the brachial plexus, and are therefore liable to compression by a cervical rib. They assumed that the compression

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