[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 1932

IRRADIATION OF MAMMARY CANCER, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO MEASURED TISSUE DOSAGE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Memorial Hospital for Cancer and Allied Diseases.

Arch Surg. 1932;24(3):339-410. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1932.01160150002001
Abstract

Carcinoma situated in the breast has certain physical advantages for treatment by irradiation. The mammary gland is superficial enough so that any tumor in its depth may receive a considerable percentage of the energy from external sources of radiation. The accessibility of the breast permits a reasonably correct measurement of the tumor, an accurate estimation of the dosage and the proper implantation of radioactive foci. The reactionary phenomena following irradiation of the breast are of little moment and are seldom complicated by sloughing and infection, which are frequently present in tumors of the respiratory, genito-urinary and alimentary canals. The loss of mammary function is relatively unimportant to patients with carcinoma of the breast, since their average age is slightly over 50 years. Irradiation of mammary cancer does not contraindicate subsequent mastectomy; therefore the opportunity is afforded to apply various methods of irradiation, to amputate the breast, to study critically the

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×