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Article
April 1932

SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF THE KIDNEYWITH COMPLETE INFARCTION OF THE KIDNEY AS A SEQUEL TO CANCEROUS THROMBOSIS OF THE RENAL ARTERY

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Department of Pathology of the Missouri Baptist Hospital and Washington University Medical School.

Arch Surg. 1932;24(4):581-590. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1932.01160160053005
Abstract

The case reported in this paper seems worthy of being placed on record for two reasons: first, because a fairly thorough review of the literature has failed to reveal a similar case of a malignant condition in which the renal artery was completely occluded by a cancerous thrombus, and, second, because total infarction of the kidney is a rarity.

REPORT OF A CASE 

History.  —A white woman, aged 64, a housewife, entered the Missouri Baptist Hospital, on Feb. 7, 1931, complaining of abdominal pains of five months' duration. At the onset of her present illness the pain was dull and achy, but during the last three weeks it had gradually become more intense and continuous, changing to a stabbing nature. It was not associated with any urinary disturbances, such as dysuria, polyuria or hematuria. Beyond pain, there was no other physical disturbance.

Examination.  —Physical examination revealed the following positive findings:

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