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Article
May 1932

AVERTIN FLUID ANESTHESIA IN SURGERY

Author Affiliations

MILWAUKEE
From the Surgical Service of the Evangelical Deaconess Hospital

Arch Surg. 1932;24(5):868-880. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1932.01160170155006
Abstract

In general anesthesia the trend is directed toward an anesthetic agent that eliminates the psychic shock and diminishes to the largest possible extent any undesirable after-effects as feared with the classic anesthetics given by inhalation.

Of new anesthetic agents introduced into clinical practice, avertin, or tribromethanol, appears most promising. The European literature reports about 400,000 cases since its introduction three years ago. In this paper a résumé of available data on its pharmacology and clinical uses is made, as well as a report of 100 cases in which avertin fluid was used.

REVIEW OF LITERATURE 

Chemical and Physical Properties.  —Avertin is tribromethanol (Willstaetter and Duisberg), a white crystalline substance, which readily sublimes and is soluble in water at 104 F. up to 3.5 per cent. It must be protected against light and heat. The avertin amylene hydrate solution, commercially called avertin fluid, contains 1 Gm. of avertin and 0.5 cc.

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