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Article
June 1932

TENNIS ELBOW (EPICONDYLITIS) CAUSED BY RADIOHUMERAL BURSITISANATOMIC, CLINICAL, ROENTGENOLOGIC AND PATHOLOGIC ASPECTS, WITH A SUGGESTION AS TO TREATMENT

Arch Surg. 1932;24(6):905-922. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1932.01160180015002
Abstract

THE CLINICAL SYNDROME  The term "tennis elbow" (epicondylitis, epicondylalgia) is a misnomer. The condition occurs in adults as a result not only of sports requiring the use of a racket (tennis, squash, court tennis) but of others, such as golf and baseball, and of occupations demanding lifting and sudden flexion and extension of the elbow, such as are required of pressers of clothing, salesmen carrying grips, violinists, blacksmiths, telephone operators and housewives. Direct trauma over the lateral aspect of the elbow may also cause this condition. Tennis elbow is frequently diagnosed as sprain or rheumatism, and the name is applied to a clinical syndrome of varying intensity characterized by pain and tenderness and sometimes accompanied by swelling and heat in the region of the epicondyle. The pain may be of a sudden, sharp, darting character causing a quick cessation of the movement involved in its production, or it may be

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