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Article
February 1933

TRANSPLANTATION OF THE INTACT MAMMALIAN HEART

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.; WASHINGTON, D. C.
From the Division of Experimental Surgery and Pathology, the Mayo Foundation, and the Physiologic Laboratory of Georgetown University School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1933;26(2):219-224. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1933.01170020053003
Abstract

The subject of transplantation of various tissues or organs is important, since great practical value might come from the development of a successful method. This applies particularly to the transplantation of an organ such as the kidney, whereby a normal organ might be exchanged for a diseased one. A comprehensive review of the subject of transplantation of tissue has been made recently by Loeb,1 and we shall, therefore, mention only a few considerations which are pertinent to our report.

Two methods have been used for the transplantation of tissue. The method usually employed both clinically and experimentally has been to excise a small section of tissue and to implant it in the desired situation, expecting it to obtain its own blood supply. The other method has been to transplant a whole organ, anastomosing its blood vessels to other suitable vessels. The latter method was made technically possible by the

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