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Article
February 1933

GASTRIC SECRETIONIII. INCREASED ACID SECRETION IN A TRANSPLANTED GASTRIC POUCH DURING LACTATION

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Surgical Service of Dr. A. A. Berg and from the Laboratory of the Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1933;26(2):235-245. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1933.01170020069005
Abstract

In four dogs with transplanted gastric pouches unusual phenomena were observed during lactation. The preparation and character of these pouches have been described in detail in two previous papers.1 In brief, the operation was done in two stages. In the first, a portion of the body along the greater curvature was cut away from the stomach and then sutured to form a pouch. This pouch was transplanted to a space in the subcutaneous tissues. The gastric blood supply to the pouch was left intact. At a second operation from three weeks to several months later, these vessels were severed, leaving the pouch dependent on a new blood supply from the abdominal wall. A second type of pouch consisted only of mucous membrane and submucosa, the muscular coats, including the plexus of Auerbach, having been removed. The secretion of these pouches has already been reported in the papers mentioned.1

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