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Article
March 1933

EXPOSURE OF THE HEART TO ATMOSPHERIC PRESSUREEFFECTS ON THE CARDIAC OUTPUT AND BLOOD PRESSURE

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.
From the Department of Surgery of Vanderbilt University.

Arch Surg. 1933;26(3):516-521. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1933.01170030173012
Abstract

During the early part of the present century a great deal of attention was focused on the use of a chamber in which negative pressure could be maintained during operations on the chest. Such a chamber was devised by Sauerbruch1 and was employed extensively in Germany. Subsequently this method was discarded because of the inconveniences which were associated with its use and because a method for inflating the lungs by positive pressure was devised. Recently Beck and his associates in this country have revived interest in the negative pressure chamber as a result of the experimental work that they have performed.

Beck and Cox2 and Beck and Isaac3 found that exposure of the heart of the dog to atmospheric pressure caused a rise in the venous pressure, a temporary decline in the arterial pressure and a decrease in the output of the heart. In the experiments of

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