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Article
April 1933

EFFECT OF INSULIN AND DEXTROSE ON THE NORMAL AND ON THE OBSTRUCTED INTESTINE

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS
From the Department of Surgery, Tulane University School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1933;26(4):658-683. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1933.01170040121009
Abstract

The intravenous administration of dextrose solution has become popular both as a preoperative and as a postoperative therapeutic measure. In addition to supplying the body with the necessary fluids in cases of dehydration, dextrose solution also supplies food that is readily utilized. A hypertonic solution of dextrose is an excellent diuretic, and therefore is of value in the prevention and treatment of cerebral edema. Dextrose solution is useful in the treatment of shock, and by virtue of its caloric value it tends to prevent and combat the development of acidosis. Largely owing to the work of Thalhimer,1 the combination of dextrose and insulin in the treatment of nondiabetic acidosis became popular. The use of this combination was continued for a considerable period of time, but within recent years it is the tendency among most clinicians not to use insulin but to administer dextrose alone. Dextrose is usually employed in

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