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Article
January 1934

EXPERIMENTAL LUMBAR SYMPATHECTOMYI. EFFECTS ON VASCULAR TREE, REACTIVE HYPEREMIA AND TEMPERATURE OF SKIN OF EXTREMITIES

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Surgery, the University of Chicago.

Arch Surg. 1934;28(1):12-15. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1934.01170130015002
Abstract

The effects of lumbar sympathectomy on the lower extremities have been extensively studied, but the results in certain respects have been sufficiently conflicting to warrant further investigation.

In this paper will be included roentgenologic observations on the peripheral vascular tree, studies on reactive hyperemia and observations on the temperature of the skin.

In all the experimental work to be presented, unilateral lumbar sympathectomy was performed, usually on the left side. This included excision of four ganglions and the intervening chains from the sacral promontory upward. Healthy adult dogs were used, and the operations were performed under morphine-ether anesthesia, aseptic technic being used.

EFFECT ON THE PERIPHERAL VASCULAR TREE  Horton and Craig1 did unilateral lumbar sympathectomies on dogs. Two to three weeks after sympathectomy, they injected metallic mercury into the aorta, after bleeding the animal, and then made roentgenologic studies of the hindlimbs. They stated that the vascular tree of

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