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Article
August 1934

A REVIEW OF UROLOGIC SURGERY

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES; ROCHESTER, MINN.; ANTWERP, BELGIUM; SEATTLE; NEW YORK; CHICAGO

Arch Surg. 1934;29(2):316-336. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1934.01180020148009
Abstract

PROSTATE GLAND 

Carcinoma.  —Young27 stated that carcinoma of the prostate gland generally begins as a nodule just beneath the posterior capsule, where it is easily palpable by way of the rectum. Hypertrophy of the prostate gland almost never begins in this region, and the two may develop concurrently, each occupying a different part of the gland; in fact, 50 per cent of patients with carcinoma of the prostate gland also have adenomatous hypertrophy, not infrequently quite remote from and entirely uninvolved by the carcinoma. Later the carcinoma spreads in all directions, ultimately penetrating the fibrotic capsule of the adenomatous enlargements and finally completely replacing the nonmalignant cells within such capsules.Young described his radical operation for the care of the prostate gland: After exposing the gland through an inverted V incision by the usual division of the central tendon and recto-urethral muscle, it is opened through the membranous urethra,

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