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Article
September 1934

HEALING OF FRACTURESITS INFLUENCE ON THE CHOICE OF METHODS OF TREATMENT

Author Affiliations

Assistant Professor of Surgery, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University; Associate Attending Surgeon, Presbyterian Hospital NEW YORK
From the Fracture Service of the Presbyterian Hospital and the Department of Surgery, College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Arch Surg. 1934;29(3):446-464. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1934.01180030111007
Abstract

For the last two decades the problem of bone formation in its various aspects has occupied the attention of many investigators. That phase of the question which deals with the mechanism of healing after fracture has been prominent in the field, and during this time quite new conceptions of the process have been evolved. From the purely academic aspect many points relative to the exact mechanism of the process are disputed. It may be considered that there is no unanimity of opinion on the following questions: (1) whether there exist in the human adult specific bone-forming cells—osteoblasts; (2) whether such cells can be evolved on demand, so to speak, by metaplasia of ordinary fibrillar connective tissue cells; (3) whether only certain connective tissue cells are capable of this transformation; (4) whether the cell itself plays any active part of a specific nature in the process; (5) whether there is formed

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