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Article
February 1935

EFFECTS OF LOCAL IMMUNIZATION ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL ABSCESSES OF THE LUNG

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS; CHICAGO
From the Department of Pathology, the University of Chicago. This work was done under a grant from the Douglas Smith Foundation for Medical Research of the University of Chicago.

Arch Surg. 1935;30(2):243-265. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1935.01180080067005
Abstract

The development of experimental methods for the production of abscesses in the lungs of dogs has contributed materially to the knowledge of the pathogenesis, complications and treatment of similar infections in man, but information as to means of prevention is still rather meager. This study deals with the preventive phase of the problem and presents data which justify the hope that localized infections of this sort can to some extent be prevented, or at least that their ill effects can be lessened.

An adequate understanding of the ways by which the lungs prevent or resist the progress of infectious agents within them depends on a proper recognition of their structural and functional characteristics under both normal and abnormal conditions. The remarkable extent to which the lungs of the average city dweller filter out and retain coal dust and the infrequency with which such particles are disseminated through the blood stream

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