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Article
May 1935

COMBINED AND SEPARATE EFFECTS OF BILE, PANCREATIC SECRETION AND TRAUMA IN EXPERIMENTAL PEPTIC ULCER

Author Affiliations

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS
From the Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Tulane University of Louisiana.

Arch Surg. 1935;30(5):833-853. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1935.01180110104007
Abstract

Nonhealing peptic ulcers simulating those occurring in man were rarely obtained by any experimental method until Mann1 in 1923 demonstrated that they could be produced at will in dogs subjected to "duodenal drainage." Later Morton,2 McCann,3 Dragstedt,4 Matthews and Dragstedt,5 and Weiss and Gurriaran6 produced similar ulcers in 100 per cent of dogs operated on in the same manner. The peptic ulcers so obtained occurred in the total absence of alkaline pancreatic juice, bile and duodenal secretions, which had been deviated into the lower intestinal tract. While the aforementioned authors conceded that the action of unneutralized acid is an important factor in the production of ulcers, McCann believed that his experiments showed that trauma was an equally, if not more important, factor in the causation of the ulcers obtained by him. The present investigation was undertaken in an attempt to determine the relative effects

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