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Article
June 1935

USE OF LOW TEMPERATURES IN CULTURE AND TRANSPORTATION OF SURGICAL MAGGOTS

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.
From the Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture.

Arch Surg. 1935;30(6):1015-1023. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1935.01180120109009
Abstract

Efficient retardation of development in the culture of surgical maggots permits the technician to maintain a constant supply with minimum effort. It is also one of the chief means by which cost of production can be lowered. Retardation is essential during the period of incubation in the tests of sterility, and it would be both economical and convenient if development could be restrained beyond this period. As subjection to low temperature has been the chief means of retardation, an investigation was made to determine its effect on maggots in storage.

A common practice of surgeons requiring a small or occasional supply of maggots is to purchase them from certain medical supply houses, and frequently shipments have to be made over long distances. Normally maggots develop rapidly, and if allowed to grow in transit they become too large for use in the wound. Their development has to be retarded in some

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