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Article
April 1936

CARCINOMA OF THE STOMACH FOLLOWING GASTROENTEROSTOMY FOR PEPTIC ULCER

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.
From the Department of Surgery, University of Michigan.

Arch Surg. 1936;32(4):679-687. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1936.01180220105006
Abstract

The development of carcinoma of the stomach after a gastrojejunal anastomosis for chronic peptic ulcer is, on the whole, unusual. Its occurrence has been observed chiefly in certain cases of gastric ulcer for which gastro-enterostomy had been performed when, because of the great size, inaccessible location or extensive fixation of the lesion, its removal would have been an excessively difficult and hazardous undertaking. It is the consensus of most present-day writers in considering the life history of gastric ulcer that approximately 5 per cent of these benign ulcers will ultimately undergo malignant degeneration if they are not healable when treated by dietary or other nonsurgical measures. It therefore seems reasonable to assume that, likewise, gastric ulcers which fail to heal after an indirect type of operation, such as gastroenterostomy, should show similar tendencies. Jean Varnier1 estimated that carcinoma will ultimately develop in from 2 to 5 per cent of

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