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Article
April 1936

EVISCERATION FOLLOWING ABDOMINAL OPERATIONS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Gallbladder Group, Michael Reese Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1936;32(4):721-729. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1936.01180220147009
Abstract

The occurrence of evisceration following laparotomy seems to be unpredictable. The uncertainty of this infrequent complication is its chief terror. We have made a survey of the cases occurring in Michael Reese Hospital during the past ten years and have analyzed those factors which seemed of importance to us, without, however, being able to reach any definite conclusions.

In going through the more recent literature on this subject, we found that Sokolov1 had analyzed the largest series. He studied reports of 732 cases collected from clinics throughout Europe and even from America. Not all the case histories gave all the information he desired. He found that almost twice as many men were eviscerated as women and that the highest incidence (55.5 per cent) was in the first six months of the year, which he thought was due to a lowering of the vitamin C content of the body. He

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