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Article
May 1936

EVAPORATION OF WATER FROM SUPERFICIAL BURNS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, N. Y.
From the departments of physiology and pediatrics, School of Medicine and Dentistry, the University of Rochester.

Arch Surg. 1936;32(5):747-755. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1936.01180230002001
Abstract

The object of the experiments was to answer the questions: Does evaporation from burned surfaces account for a significant portion of the dehydration of the body that is believed to be present after accidental burns? Does the treatment of these surfaces with tannic acid materially modify this evaporation?

METHOD 

Apparatus.  —A glass capsule was fitted with inlet and outlet tubes opposite one another. It enclosed an area of skin of 22 sq. cm. A thermocouple on the end of a piece of bakelite tubing was held inside the capsule, so that it was pressed lightly against the surface of the skin at all times. Wires to a cold junction and to a galvanometer passed through the tubing and the sealed top of the capsule. The capsule was sealed air-tight to the cutaneous surface with petrolatum. A stream of air was measured by passage through a dry meter, was dried by

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