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Article
May 1936

EFFECT OF INFLAMMATION ON THE EPIPHYSES

Author Affiliations

LONDON, CANADA
From the Division of Orthopedic Surgery of the Department of Surgery of the University of Western Ontario.

Arch Surg. 1936;32(5):810-822. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1936.01180230065005
Abstract

The known and commonly described infections which occur in human beings at the epiphysis or at its union with the diaphysis are as follows:

A. Acute osteomyelitis.

B. Chronic involvement; associated with tuberculosis, syphilis, undulant fever (rare) or actinomycosis (rare).

C. Gradual necrosing lesions of bone the etiology of which is disputed:

1. Köhler's disease of the tarsal navicular bone; 2. Freiberg's disease of the heads of the metatarsal bones; 3. Kienböck's disease of the carpal semilunar bone and many other bones; 4. Koenig's osteochondritis dissecans of the medial condyle of the femur; 5. apophysitis of the os calcis (Sever); 6. aseptic necrosis of the head of the femur, the radius, the humerus or the distal epiphysis of the femur; 7. Osgood-Schlatter's disease of the tibial tubercle; 8. Legg's or Calvé-Perthes' disease, osteochondritis juvenilis.

In this paper it would be impossible to deal with this great variety of diseases about

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