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Article
August 1936

ALLERGY AS AN EXPLANATION OF DEHISCENCE OF A WOUND AND INCISIONAL HERNIA

Author Affiliations

Assistant Attending Surgeon, New York Post-Graduate Hospital; Associate Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital NEW YORK

Arch Surg. 1936;33(2):197-209. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1936.01190020013002
Abstract

Dehiscence or disruption of a wound occurs with sufficient frequency to warrant the presentation of a symposium on this subject before the New York Surgical Society in 1933. Papers were read by members of the staffs of five hospitals in New York, and Meleney and Howes1 reported 55 cases from the Presbyterian Hospital in an eight year period, or an incidence of 1 per cent. They thought that the diagnosis had been frequently omitted from the records if there had not been a secondary closure and that 2 per cent would more nearly represent the incidence of this catastrophe. Colp2 reported 29 cases in 2,750 laparotomies, or an incidence of 0.9 per cent, from the Mount Sinai Hospital. Grace3 reported 44 cases in a fifteen year period from the first surgical division of the Bellevue Hospital. White4 reported 30 cases from the Roosevelt Hospital. Heyd5

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