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Article
December 1936

A PLAN FOR THE TREATMENT OF CANCER WITH SMALL QUANTITIES OF RADIUM

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Memorial Hospital for Cancer and Allied Diseases, New York, and the Josephine Lendrim Tumor Clinic of the Paterson General Hospital, Paterson, N. J.

Arch Surg. 1936;33(6):940-994. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1936.01190060030003
Abstract

A disease such as cancer, which is inevitably fatal if untreated, should receive the best possible management by physicians skilled in its diagnosis and treatment. The cancer institute is the ideal solution, as it includes a hospital organized and maintained solely for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer as well as adequate research laboratories. It is not feasible to care for all patients with cancer in institutes or hospitals devoted exclusively to the treatment of cancer because such institutions must be situated in centers of large population. It is obvious for economic and social reasons that the practical needs of the average community are best met by the cancer clinic in a general hospital. Since only a relatively small number of patients suffering from cancer can be taken care of in institutes and hospitals devoted to the treatment of cancer, the general hospitals throughout the country have the serious responsibility

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