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Article
December 1936

HERNIA INTO THE UMBILICAL CORD AND RELATED ANOMALIES

Arch Surg. 1936;33(6):1021-1045. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1936.01190060111005
Abstract

Hernia into the umbilical cord, or true congenital umbilical hernia, as the condition is now termed, is a comparatively uncommon anomaly. It is said to occur once in every 5,000 or 6,000 new-born infants.1 Like all anomalies of embryonal development, in no two cases does it present exactly the same anatomic picture or the same surgical problem, although in a general way the manifestations are always similar. Furthermore, the chance that any one surgeon will see or operate on any large number of patients with uncommon anomalies is unlikely. Hence, the surgical procedures are as varied as the anatomic peculiarities and as the operative technics. For these reasons I believe that the case to be described here merits recording. The comments on closely related anomalies are based almost entirely on case reports in the literature and are given in order to emphasize by comparison or contrast the close relationship

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